Scouse!

‘A good blog has a theme’. That’s what WordPress says. This is supposed to be a food blog but it’s really quite difficult to come up with original food ideas that don’t a) require lots of expensive ingredients and b) require skills and patiences I don’t have (and don’t want) whilst c) keeping my BMI index below ‘super-fat-bastard-how-come-you’re-still-breathing’ levels.

So I have resorted to cooking things but not eating them. That’s easy enough because as my wife will tell you I have the willpower of an ox (do they have willpower?). I have also decided to explore dishes from yesteryear – simple things that your Granny would have made. Here we explore the delights of ‘Scouse’ a dish that was originally eaten by sailors across Northern Europe and lent its name to the locals of the port of Liverpool.

In every way it is effectively Irish Stew – and its dead easy, inoffensive even.

The idea was that the Adventurous Eater would make this and then we’d take it to the in-laws as our ‘pot luck’ contribution.

To make scouse you need basically what is in the photo above:

  • About 1/2 kilo of lamb neck
  • 2 or 3 carrots
  • A couple of leeks
  • 2 celery stalks
  • Two potatoes
  • An onion
  • Chicken stock (about 3/4 litre)
  • Herbs (a bouquet garni is best)
  • 2 tablespoons of flour

First off chop up everything with a nice big sharp knife:

Kids love playing with knives:

Brown the meat in batches and set aside:

Add the vegetables to the pan and cook in the fat released by the lamb for a few minutes:

Add the flour and continue to cook:

Put the lamb back in and add the stock and the herb bag:

Simmer until the liquid thickens up (add more flour if needed):

And thats it. So off we went with our Scouse – transfered to the orange pot:

And served it up with ciabatta:

It all went!

And there were plenty other delicious morsels including chocolate brownies prepared by the French sister-in-law:

Vegetarian sausage rolls from the mother-in-law, which even the fussy eater ate:

They went so quick I nearly didn’t get a photo…

Mini quiches popped up:

And even Eton Mess, to go with the Brownies!

All in all a real good feast!

29 thoughts on “Scouse!

  1. Pingback: Norfolk Plough Pudding « Happiness Stan Lives Here

  2. I don’t know if an ox has willpower or not, but my husband doesn’t & has been complaining about his waistline since I started my blog & reading everyone else’s. Guess I need to break it up with other things or create a bunch of salads. This one really does look like a great feast.

  3. The equivalent here is sold as Hungarian Goulash – very warming on a winter’s evening, but usually comprises too much floating fat and gristle so best avoided! The Scouse version looks much better. Nice blog, keep it up.

  4. Hehe! I totally get what you mean. If we could only post what we are allow to eat, then all food blogs will be stuffed only with salad recipes… And the really good ones will be written by super models with the metabolism of a cheetah 😉
    Love the recipe for the scouse, you are right, that’s 100% traditional, healthy and delicious!!

  5. also your starbucks rant about insisting on having your name was a hoot. forced familiarity from large corporations is manipulatively annoying. your posts ring true, which causes the laughter. i say, “Fly your freak flag high!”

  6. i enjoy your blog for being quirky and authentic. you have my support for keeping it just as it is, without having to invent or reinvent yourself or you posts. I think you’re terrific, just as you are. I laughed so hard at your first video of the rain during the “drought.” i find your spontaneity refreshing, in this pre-packaged world of ours.

  7. Your Scouse looks excellent. I have a fear of Irish Stew going back to my youth when we would be served boiled mutton with parsley sauce. The mutton really needed an awful lot of boiling. The meat would be that awful combination of cooked and stringy, with some greasy water left on the plate. The associated flavour and smells were similar to the Irish Stew that we were served back then. Perhaps I should give it a go and put that ghost to rest.
    Best,
    Conor

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